We use "Cookies" on this website to improve your experience and to provide us with anonymous information. Read more here. [x] Close

Family Law Blog

Comment on divorce & family law 

Can I sign a prenuptial agreement after I’m married?

couple holding hands.

This is a question we’re hearing from more and more couples. In some instances, it’s when we tell them they have left it too late to get a prenup before marriage. Whilst called something slightly different there is an equivalent that can be prepared and signed after the marriage or civil ceremony has taken place – it’s called a post-nuptial agreement.

Can Prince Harry help us make 2018 the Year of the Pre-nup?

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle.

So Prince Harry has decided not to sign a pre-nup before marrying Meghan Markle, according to reports. He believes he doesn’t need to safeguard his estimated £30 million fortune because he is marrying Ms Markle for life – who herself is said to be worth £4 million and is on her second marriage.

How can the law help unmarried couples?

unmarried couple holding hands and walking.

There have been calls for years now for the law to do more to help unmarried, cohabiting couples. When a couple marries, they immediately get certain legal rights and liabilities. So, for instance, their joint property and assets are split if they divorce, with a starting point of a 50/50 split and this is regardless of who has been paying the mortgage or generating the savings.

Why do I need a family lawyer to get a divorce?

divorce lawyer sat at wooden table with pen and paperwork.

You would think that the answer to this question is obvious, wouldn’t you? To advise on the law of course, but it is not as simple as that. Whilst there is the obvious benefit of having proper legal advice there are many other reasons to have a specialist family lawyer on your side.

Child contact with non-resident parent - thinking practically

close up of parent holding hands with child and walking outside.

Trying to reach an agreement about child contact with non-resident parents, especially when the situation may feel raw, can be difficult. However, the main focus has to be what is in the best interests of the child, rather than what you ideally want or what you feel you should be ‘entitled’ to.

Receive your FREE guide

Your free guide will be available to download immediately and a copy sent by email. Your email address will not be used to send any further correspondence without your permission.